“Travel and change of place impart new vigor to the mind.” – Seneca

                Now that I’m an official adult (with a job and everything!), I find myself missing my travels more than ever. I’ve been incredibly lucky in that I’ve been a lot of places and done a lot of amazing things. I recently rediscovered my travel journal from my semester abroad in Greece. After re-reading my journal, rolling my eyes at some of my commentary, but mostly just wishing I was traveling again, I decided to include some entries here for the sake of posterity, and, mostly, because I want to. I might add some reflections that were not originally noted in my journal. I’ll denote those with a different font or something. I hope you enjoy time-traveling with me!

September 26, 2007: Visiting the Palace of Knossos

               Yesterday was our first day in Crete and we went straight from the ferry to Knossos. The palace at Knossos was sprawling and packed with tour groups.  The architecture of the palace and the sophistication of it all was amazing; the fact that such a huge structure would be made from such primitive tools is fascinating.  While some of Sir Arthur Evans’ “reconstitution” of the site was helpful in envisioning how the palace would have been, a lot of it was also very distracting.

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Reflections: Knossos was amazing. I vividly remember wandering down the roads, half-listening to our Professor (who was rocking his infamous powder blue linen jacket) but mostly trying to absorb my surroundings. Knossos is a Minoan Palace, which makes it home to one of the most primitive civilizations known to man. Legend has it that the minotaur stalked the pathways of the labyrinth at Knossos. I’ll let you make your own decisions on that, but there was certainly something special about this mountain palace. Like many places in Greece, there is a charge in the air here, leaving you feeling energized, curious, and inspired.

September 30, 2007: Hiking the Samaria Gorge, Chania, Crete

                  Once our bus finished careening up the mountain my nerves calmed down a little bit. The initial descent wasn’t as steep and perilous as I envisioned it being. It was more of a legit path with a railing, but since the rocks were fairly loose and worn smooth, it was a bit tricky. If I wanted to actually look at the scenery at any point, I literally had to stop because I would have slipped and killed myself.

                 After the second bathroom area (and I use the term “bathroom” loosely because it was a porcelain hole in the ground with foot placements), we started singing Disney songs to keep us going. Mulan was the soundtrack of choice.

                Anyway, the hike was long and my feet were killing me by the end.  Once we descended into the actual gorge, it was even harder to walk because everything was just loose stone. The views were amazing, though, and, in the end, I am glad I did it. 

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Reflections: Man, did I bitch and moan about having to hike this gorge. I still bring it up in casual conversation with my mother (“Hey, remember that time I hiked a gorge?”) It was a 10ish-mile hike, and I was completely unprepared (ie. I only had my fashion-over-function tennis shoes). I continue to be proud of myself for doing the hike, though, and incredibly happy that I did it. I’ve literally never done anything like it, before or since. First of all, it was gorgeous. The trees, the boulders, the little rock formations that past hikers had created and left as monuments to the gods and nature. The camaraderie with my little hiking group as we tromped through climate changes, suspicious terrain, and potentially dangerous animals (I mean, there probably were some there…) What I remember most, though, is finally emerging from the gorge and half-hobbling straight into the Mediterranean Sea. The salt DID NOT feel great on the several hike-related injuries I had sustained. But the warm water was soothing and calming, and felt like a wonderful reward. I would love to go back and hike Samaria Gorge again (who am I and what have I done with Kate?!) Any takers?


Me every day when I get home from work


WHEN I SEE A FRIEND IN THE LAST WEEK OF BAR REVIEW


allthingseurope:

Dublin, Ireland (by Axiraa)

allthingseurope:

Dublin, Ireland (by Axiraa)



cutestofthecute:

(via)

So cute it hurts

cutestofthecute:

(via)

So cute it hurts


"Any Piece of Good Music is in Essence a Love Song"

This past weekend I had the wonderful luck of listening to a community string orchestra perform at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Being immersed as I am in law and criminals and some of the darker aspects of humanity, it was a wonderful breath of fresh air to sit back and listen to beauty as it happened.  It also made me realize how desperately I miss music.  I don’t mean singing, per se, because I do that frequently and loudly at karaoke.  

I miss being part of a choir performing a work that is hundreds of years old. I miss getting chills as I hold my score when the right amalgamation of notes and melodies coincide into a burst of magic. I miss watching people with tears in their eyes as I make music. But I am glad I was able to experience what I did on Friday night.

The orchestra played both classical and colloquial selections. Mozart alongside the Bonanza fugue. They finished their set with a compilation of moments from The Pirates of the Caribbean. Whether the tone was playful, melancholy, or serious, though, I had a smile on my face and in my heart. Music is just good for my soul. 


Sum-sum-summa time

Sum-sum-summa time



east-coasting-it:

cliche—-url:

Color Me Rad 5K
wahoo

east-coasting-it:

cliche—-url:

Color Me Rad 5K

wahoo

(via sameneonlights)